Stomach bloating diet: Prevent trapped wind pain without dinner foods

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Stomach bloating is a common condition that affects most people at some point in their lifetime. It can make the stomach feel swollen, puffy, and generally uncomfortable, said the NHS. Your bloating pain may be caused by eating certain gassy foods, or by eating too fast or too much. You could be at risk of stomach bloating if you regularly eat onions, it’s been claimed.

Regularly eating onions could be raising your chances of bloating pain, according to nutritionist Adda Bjarnadottir.

They contain soluble fibres that some people struggle to break down in the gut, she said.

If you’re sensitive or intolerant to onions, it may be a better idea to swap them for herbs or spices.

But you could also be left with a painful stomach ache if you eat a lot of beans, she added.

“Most beans contain sugars called alpha-galactosides, which belong to a group of carbs called FODMAPs,” she wrote on medical website Healthline.

“FODMAPs [fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols] are short-chain carbohydrates that escape digestion and are then fermented by gut bacteria in the colon. Gas is a byproduct of this process.

“For healthy people, FODMAPs simply provide fuel for the beneficial digestive bacteria and should not cause any problems.

“However, for individuals with irritable bowel syndrome, another type of gas is formed during the fermentation process.

“This may cause major discomfort, with symptoms like bloating, flatulence, cramping and diarrhoea.”

Lentils are also legumes that contain FODMAPs, and may contribute to excessive wind, she added.

Cruciferous vegetables – including broccoli and cabbage – contain the same indigestible carbohydrates, but cooking them makes them easier to digest.

Stomach bloating may be caused by constipation, trapped wind, irritable bowel syndrome, or by swallowing too much air.

You could swallow air by drinking through a straw, or by talking with your mouth full of food.

People are more likely to feel bloated after a big weekend – especially around the festive season.

Speak to a doctor if your bloating symptoms don’t go away, said the NHS.

It could be caused by something more serious, including ovarian cancer.



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