Doris Day dead at 97: Icon broke HUGE music record eight years ago | Music | Entertainment

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Day achieved incredible things during her illustrious career – and recorded more than 650 songs between 1947 and 1967.

But her music stardom continued well into the 21st century when she broke a huge record in 2011.

It was in that year that she scored another Top 10 album in the UK – thus becoming the oldest person ever to do so, with a collection of previously unreleased material.

Although Vera Lynn peaked at No3 with Vera Lynn 100 in 2017, that was a compilation of previously released recordings.

My Heart contained thirteen tracks, of which eight could be classed as new.

Written mainly with Bruce Johnston and her son Terry Melcher, the pieces were intended to serve as background music for segments on her Doris Day’s Best Friends TV show in the mid-1980s.

Of course in that period, she had already stopped releasing albums: her final collection Doris Day’s Sentimental Journey came out in 1965, although The Love Album – recorded in 1967 – never saw the light of day until 1994.

In the USA, My Heart peaked at No135 on the Billboard 200; her first charting release in that country in 47 years.

MORE: DORIS DAY WAS ICONIC IN CALAMITY JANE

A statement from the Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed her passing; saying she died at her home in Carmel Valley, California.

It said she had been “in excellent physical health for her age, until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia”.

The statement added: “She was surrounded by a few close friends as she passed.”

Day starred in films such as Calamity Jane and Pillow Talk, as well as Alfred Hitchock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and That Touch of Mink.

She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004, and the Grammys gifted her a Lifetime Achievement prize in 2008.

Her most famous songs, meanwhile, surely include the 1956 release of Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be).

Amongst the tributes, George Takei tweeted: “For those of us in my generation, Doris Day was synonymous with Hollywood icon.

“She would no doubt remind us, upon this day of her passing, ‘Que sera sera,’ but we will miss her dearly anyway. Rest now in our hearts forever, Ms. Day.”

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